The one Twitter trick that Pipedrive founders master

Pipedrive has five co-founders that all use Twitter. Lighty, I should add, because their accounts are not used that much, neither for promoting Pipedrive nor casual social media chatter. When I started advising the company on marketing matters I’ve encouraged non-tech members of the team to take a more active role on Twitter. Share insights, grow followers, participate in conversations kind of thing. This seemed very appropriate for a startup without a marketing budget.

They were polite and kind of tried but the one thing they’ve done exceptionally really well is … ignore my advice. So today, 18 months since our first chats, Pipedrive business founders don’t “engage” with the followers, they don’t share interesting articles they read and they don’t follow people to grow their own influence. They don’t use Twitter at all like all the “social media gurus” recommend.

Why ignoring Twitter is a good thing

Spending next to no time on Twitter has allowed the team to focus on what they’re good at. Build a product that people love and use in-person sales skills, for example. As a startup you have limited resources and spreading them to thin can cost you dearly. If you’re a social media aficionado by nature, congratulations, you can use it to promote your business among other things. If using Twitter doesn’t come naturally to you, forgetting about it might be the right thing to do.

That said, most companies need to invest a little bit of time into Twitter, to respond to people’s @mentions and put out a tweet when the blog or product has been updated. But this takes next to no time. Pipedrive founders are a living case study that once the bare minimum is done, you can safely ignore Twitter and … get on with your work.

Meet the team

Here’s the founding team of Pipedrive, through the lens of Twitter:

@Tajur – Klout score at 26 and “shopping” and “family” listed as topics Martin is influential about hasn’t stopped him from kicking ass in design and development of Pipedrive.
@urmaspurde – hasn’t sent an @mention to anyone in the last couple of months – but looks after legal and partner sides of things #likeaboss.
@nokkloom- the most active Twitter user of this quintet, mostly for social, not business purposes. Influential about Television and Evolution, among other things, if Klout is to be trusted. But he sure knows how to make users happy.
@ragnars. 4 tweets in July, one in June – the usual pattern, unless he’s organising a hackatlon, in which case this shoots up to dozens of tweets per day. Lack of tweets hasn’t stopped him from being a killer networker which has resulted in some important hires.
@timorein – probably the worst Twitter user on the Northern hemisphere, with last tweet originating from May 11th. Yours truly has to ping him on Skype to remind him to tweet about blog posts he has published. But when it comes to product and setting direction, he’s brilliant.

See also: Forget Engagement, Consumers Want Simplicity

  • http://twitter.com/MeelisVill Meelis Vill

    I like this advisor!

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  • http://devblog.ailon.org Alan Mendelevich

    Nice “save”, but not really ;) Twitter takes next to no time if you have more than 1 monitor (or have some other efficient way of using it) and quite often does wonders.

    I was evaluating CRMs yesterday and basically settled on Pipedrive. I mentioned @pipedrive several times on twitter and had a few discussions that included @pipedrive, but haven’t seen any reaction from you guys and, honestly, this makes me a little less confident about my choice of CRM.

    • Andrus

      Hey Alan. Spotted your post yesterday, thanks again, and simply chose to RT it today as your tweets were time-critical. For support-related we usually respond rather quickly.